Spider-Man: Far From Home makes us love the cast even more

Peter Parker returns in Spider-Man: Far From Home, the next chapter of the Spider-Man: Homecoming series! Our friendly neighborhood Super Hero decides to join his best friends Ned, MJ, and the rest of the gang on a European vacation.

However, Peter’s plan to leave super heroics behind for a few weeks are quickly scrapped when he begrudgingly agrees to help Nick Fury uncover the mystery of several elemental creature attacks, creating havoc across the continent!

Rating: PG-13 (for sci-fi action violence, some language and brief suggestive comments)

Genre: Action & Adventure, Science Fiction & Fantasy

Directed By: Jon Watts

Written By: Chris McKenna (II), Erik Sommers

Runtime: 130 minutes

Studio: Sony Pictures

Nobody can be a hundred percent on all the time, including the cast of Spider-Man: Far From Home — and this is a great thing for comedy.

In advance of the flick’s Blu-ray release, Sony Pictures has released a short blooper reel featuring a choice selection of screwups by the cast. We didn’t think it was possible for us to love these guys any more, yet here we are.

The clip is featured on the home release for Far From Home across all platforms, and all we can say is that we really hope there’s more where this came from. It’s always fun to see your favorite superheroes and their buddies making complete asses of themselves, but in the case of the Spidey sequel’s young cast, it’s almost more fun to see how they lean into their mistakes and enjoy a good laugh at their own expense.

The clip opens with Jacob Batalon (who portrays Peter Parker’s best buddy and “guy in the chair” Ned) and Angourie Rice (who plays fellow Midtown High student Betty Brant, who briefly serves as Ned’s love interest) as they’re preparing to shoot their scenes aboard the Ferris wheel at the carnival in Prague. Apparently, a mistake was made while the cameras were rolling on this shot, as Batalon says, “Welcome to the bloopers. I feel like we haven’t messed up too bad…” Rice then chimes in with, “Well, I haven’t.” Batalon considers it, then says, “Well, that’s to be discussed, but okay,” as Rice flashes a mischievous grin at the camera.

We then get a brief montage of various cast members warming up before takes, including a nice Shakespearian turn by Jake Gyllenhaal (who portrays Quentin Beck/Mysterio) and what appears to be an imitation of director Jon Watts by star Tom Holland, rattling off encouragement as he sits next to Batalon aboard a plane (“Have a great take, everybody, a lot of energy,” he says in his flawless American accent).

Interspersed with shots of the cast screwing around are some hilariously blown scenes. First, we see Holland’s Peter Parker, in his black stealth costume (sorry, his “Night Monkey” getup) falling all over himself in a very un-Spidey-like fashion, somehow remaining in character (he’s repeating “Beck! Beck!” to himself) as he hilariously attempts and fails to recover.

Next, we get a shot of Batalon and Holland engaged in dialogue during the Midtown group’s first hotel stop. “I’m a virgin,” Batalon’s Ned confides to his buddy, whereupon Holland promptly sneezes his head halfway off. Cast and crew can be heard cracking up in the background as Holland composes himself, saying, “I’m so sorry, dude. I was trying so hard not to sneeze!”

Then, we get a quick montage of Tony Revolori’s Flash Thompson flubbing the same line (“Parker! How much blood did you donate to afford this trip?”) over and over again, and displaying a much better sense of humor about himself than his character ever has; followed by a shot of Samuel L. Jackson’s Nick Fury talking with Parker, who is in full costume in his Stark suit.

Holland is fiddling with the case which contains the special glasses passed down to him by Tony Stark (you know, the ones imbued with the intensely powerful AI known as EDITH), and as Jackson begins to deliver his line, Holland snaps the case shut, distracting him. Jackson responds in exactly the way one would expect, barking, “Don’t shut the thing on my f***in’ line!” Holland simply hangs his head and chuckles as Jackson makes a show of snatching the case away from him.

Finally, we have the scene in which Beck and Parker are having a little heart-to-heart atop a building. Gyllenhaal, for some bizarre reason, decides to go with a rather out-of-left-field alternate take of his dialogue, saying, “Back home, I had a sick closet full of… mostly John Varvatos,” which cracks up Holland and the entire crew. (In case you’re unaware, John Varvatos is a high-end men’s clothing line; we certainly don’t remember Beck being so well-versed in the world of fashion.)

Unfortunately, it’s near-impossible to talk about Spider-Man: Far From Home, or Spider-Man in general, without there being a touch of the bittersweet to the conversation (or, depending on whom you’re talking to, maybe a big old dollop of plain bitter). As it stands right now, Far From Home looks to be the wall-crawler’s final appearance in the Marvel Cinematic Universe — that is, unless Marvel Studios and rights holder Sony Pictures can make nice long enough to get an extension of their previous deal in place.

But, as has been alluded to by Marvel Studios head honcho Kevin Feige, the fact that Spidey got to have a five-movie arc in the MCU is, in and of itself, some kind of minor miracle — and in our humble opinion, Far From Home and its predecessor, 2017’s Spider-Man: Homecoming, are the best representations of the character ever put to film.

Getting ol’ web-head back into the MCU doesn’t seem too likely at this point; it’d be kind of like catching lightning in a bottle, letting it out, and then getting it back into the bottle. But at least, in collaboration with Mighty Marvel Studios, Sony was able to give us two near-perfect Spider-Man movies — and it’s nice to know that the flicks’ cast had just as much fun making them as we had watching them.

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